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Showing posts with label Turkey. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Turkey. Show all posts

Thursday, May 23, 2019

Turkey’s largest enterprise – Arcelik’s Technology Chief visits Pakistan

Turkey’s largest enterprise – Arcelik’s Technology Chief visits Pakistan

Turkey’s largest enterprise – Arcelik’s Technology Chief visits Pakistan


Karachi, May 22, 2019: The Chief Technology Officer of Arcelik – the largest Turkish enterprise came to Pakistan, for an official visit from 14th to 16th of May, 2019. During this 3-days tour, the CTO Oguzhan Ozturk held meetings with the corporate leaders and operational teams of Dawlance – the market-leader in Pakistan’s home-appliances industry.

Arcelik is also the third-largest manufacturer in Europe, while Dawlance is its fully owned subsidiary in Pakistan that produces the most reliable electronics, appliances, and other products for the consumers.

In Pakistan, Ozturk also visited the home-appliance market and toured the Dawlance manufacturing facilities in Karachi and Hyderabad. The purpose of his visit was primarily to make a first-hand assessment of the progress made by Dawlance, with continued investments in innovative product-development and modernization of its manufacturing facilities in Pakistan. 

Ozturk commented that: Since acquiring Dawlance in 2016, Arçelik has invested more than 36 Million Euros in its Pakistani subsidiary, to improve productivity through research and development of new products, in accordance with the evolving needs of this growing market. More investments are being made in Product-Designing and Design-Facilities too, while new equipment and machinery are being deployed to further expand the wide range of Dawlance products. Additional capital of 16 Million Euros is expected to be injected within the current calendar year, 2019.

During his interactions with the Dawlance teams, Ozturk emphasized on the need to design products that fulfill and exceed the specific needs of the Pakistani consumers. At the same time, the company must continue its compliance with global standards of quality and safety. He commended the Dawlance team on their performance and assured them of every possible support from Arçelik global.

He inspired the team with his vision for deploying the most advanced technologies at Dawlance. Being a highly qualified Technology expert, he suggested many guidelines for improving the efficiency of the plant and machinery to derive higher productivity with lesser energy-consumption.

Owing to the rising costs of energy in Pakistan, Dawlance has always remained at the forefront to create energy-conservation technologies for robust appliances that can withstand the hot weather and other environmental hazards in Pakistan. Ozturk also appreciated the rapid expansion of Dawlance’s After Sales network all over the country, as the company believes that providing 24/7 Customer-Care is the key to winning the consumers’ trust.

He further stressed on the need to enhance technical collaboration between Dawlance plant in Pakistan and Arçelik global plants in Turkey, Russia, Romania, Thailand, and South Africa. The Dawlance team was also assured that in the coming days, Arçelik will further increase the pace of transferring technical know-how and expertise to the engineering team at Dawlance.



Friday, January 26, 2018

Syria - 1st week of Turkish attack on Afrin killed 102 - FoxNews

Syria - 1st week of Turkish attack on Afrin killed 102 - FoxNews

Syria - 1st week of Turkish attack on Afrin killed 102 - FoxNews






BEIRUT, Lebanon –  The Latest on Syria developments (all times local):

12:55 p.m.

The Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces says the first week of Turkey's incursion into the Syrian Kurdish enclave of Afrin has left more than a 100 civilians and fighters dead.

The SDF said in a statement Friday that the dead are 59 civilians and 43 fighters, including eight women fighters. It said 134 civilians were wounded in the weeklong clashes.

Turkey's military offensive against the Kurdish-controlled enclave of Afrin in northwestern Syria, which began Saturday, had raised the possibility of the creation of a 30-kilometer-deep (20-mile) "safe zone" in Syria running along Turkey's border

___

12:10 p.m.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is vowing to expand Ankara's operation in a Kurdish enclave in northern Syria eastward, toward the frontier with Iraq.

The announcement came as Erdogan spoke on Friday to his ruling-party officials in the capital, Ankara.

Erdogan says the push into Afrin would stretch to the Syrian Kurdish town of Manbij and toward the border with Iraq, "until no terrorist is left."

Manbij is held by the U.S.-backed Syrian Kurdish militia, which Turkey considers a terrorist group and an extension of its own insurgent group.

Pushing into Manbj would put Turkish troops in proximity to American soldiers there.

Erdogan again slammed the United States, a NATO ally, for backing the Kurdish group, saying: "how can a strategic partner do such a thing to its strategic partner?"

Read more on source

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

110 civilians killed in 2 weeks of Turkish airstrikes on Syria’s al-Bab: SOHR

110 civilians killed in 2 weeks of Turkish airstrikes on Syria’s al-Bab: SOHR


A UK-based monitoring group says at least 110 civilians have been killed by Turkish airstrikes in the Daesh-held Syrian city of al-bab over the past two weeks.

The so-called Syrian Observatory for Human Rights noted that on Monday alone eleven members of one family were killed as their home was destroyed by Turkish airstrikes and shelling aimed at paving the way for advancing Turkey-backed militants.   

"There is fierce bombardment from Turkish forces on Daesh positions in al-Bab," added the group.

It added that a large number of civilians are forced to flee their homes every day as Turkish-backed militants make advances in the city.

"I saw destruction -- the artillery and the airplanes shelling. There's destruction everywhere," said one fleeing civilian. "We got out safe and sound, thank God, and the town is now encircled," he added.

Al-Bab is Daesh’s final bastion in the northern Syrian province of Aleppo -- second only in significance to the terrorists group's de facto capital in adjacent Raqqah.

In August 2016, Turkey began a major military intervention in Syria, dubbed "Euphrates Shield," sending tanks and warplanes across the border.

Ankara claimed that its military campaign was aimed at pushing Daesh from Turkey's border with Syria and stopping the advance of Kurdish forces, but Damascus denounced the operation as a breach of its sovereignty.

"Euphrates Shield fighters gathered last night and divided up the town into three axes to facilitate the storming of al-Bab," said a local militant field commander, Abu Jaafar.

He added that his forces were able to seize control of a medical complex, a key roundabout, and a school building in the town's west side in operations that began on midnight.

"We've faced some difficulty with Daesh snipers -- there were more than 10 snipers last night that surprised our troops," Abu Jaafar added. "More than 10 of our forces were killed (Monday), and dozens wounded, because of the mines planted by this treacherous organization," he noted.

Source: Press TV



Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Govt sacks 4,400 more civil servants, including teachers and police

Govt sacks 4,400 more civil servants, including teachers and police

by Reuters

Turkey has dismissed more than 4,400 civil servants including teachers, police officers and academics over their suspected links with terrorist organisations, a decree showed late on Tuesday, in the latest purge since a failed coup last July.

Ibrahim Kaboglu, a prominent constitution professor who has expressed opposition to planned constitutional changes giving President Tayyip Erdogan greater executive powers, was among those ousted under the decree published in the Official Gazette.

Court clerks, computer experts and librarians were also among 4,464 sacked, part of a crackdown since the July coup bid which Turkey says was carried out by U.S.-based Islamic cleric Fethullah Gulen. Gulen denies the allegation.

The dismissals drew criticism on social media, with main opposition CHP lawmaker Sezgin Tanrikulu saying on Twitter that Turkey's long-established universities were being destroyed.

Turkey has already removed or suspended more than 125,000 people and formally arrested 40,000 since the attempted coup during which rogue soldiers tried to overthrow the government and Erdogan, killing more than 240 people, most of them civilians.

The government says the action is justified by the nature of the threat to the state.

The crackdown has covered a wide range of professions from civil servants and soldiers to medics. Dismissals are announced in the Official Gazette with no reasons given beyond "membership of, or links to, terrorist organisations or groups deemed to be acting against national security interests".

Rights groups and some European countries have said Erdogan is using the current state of emergency to quash dissent. Ankara says the measures are necessary to root out supporters of the putsch and other terrorists.

Among the 330 academics dismissed were those who signed a petition last year criticising military action in the restive southeast against Kurdish militants. Erdogan had said the academics would pay a price for their "treachery".

Hundreds of civilians, members of the security forces and militants have been killed since the conflict with the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) reignited in July 2015 in the worst violence Turkey has seen for 20 years. The PKK is designated a terrorist group by Turkey, the United States and the European Union.



Sunday, December 18, 2016

13 #Turkish soldiers killed, 48 wounded in Kayseri bombing

13 #Turkish soldiers killed, 48 wounded in Kayseri bombing

ISTANBUL (AFP) - Thirteen Turkish soldiers were killed and dozens more wounded in a car bombing targeting off-duty conscripts being taken by bus on a weekend shopping trip, the latest in a string of attacks to rock Turkey in recent months.

Forty-eight soldiers were wounded in Saturday’s attack in the central Anatolian city of Kayseri, the army said in a statement, adding that there could also be civilian casualties.

Television pictures showed that the bus had been reduced to a smouldering wreck by the impact of the blast, as wounded were taken to waiting ambulances.

The explosion comes a week after 44 people were killed on December 10 in a double bombing in Istanbul after a football match. The attack was claimed by Kurdish militants.

Deputy Prime Minister Veysi Kaynak said in televised comments that the attack in Kayseri was "unfortunately similar" to last weekend’s strikes in Istanbul.

The army said that the bus -- carrying low-ranking privates and non-commissioned officers -- was attacked after leaving the commando headquarters in the city.

The bus was owned by the municipal transport authorities in Kayersi but was transporting the soldiers who had taken permission to go to a local market for the day, the Dogan news agency said.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has been informed of the attack by the chief of staff General Hulusi Akar, Anadolu added.

Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu was on his way to the city, it said.

‘PAY A HEAVY PRICE’

Turkey has seen a spate of deadly bombings in a bloody 2016 blamed both on jihadists and Kurdish militants that have left dozens dead and put the country on daily alert.

In June, 47 people were killed in a triple suicide bombing and gun attack at Istanbul’s Ataturk airport, with authorities blaming the Islamic State group.

Another 57 people including 34 children were killed in August in a suicide attack by an IS-linked bomber at a Kurdish wedding in the southeastern city of Gaziantep.

Kurdish militants have twice struck with bombings that killed dozens in Ankara in February and March.

The attacks have come with the civil war still raging in neighbouring Syria, where Turkey is staging its own incursion to force militants and Kurdish militia from the border area.

Turkey is also still reeling from a failed July 15 coup blamed on the US-based preacher Fethullah Gulen that has been followed by a relentless purge of his alleged supporters from all state institutions.

One of the main cities of central Turkey, Kayseri is a key industrial hub with a population of over one million and usually seen as a peaceful area.

It is well west of the southeast of the country that has been hit by months of deadly fighting between the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) and the security forces.

There was no immediate indication of who was behind the latest attack.

The government slapped a temporary broadcast ban on footage of the attack, as is becoming typical in the aftermath of major incidents in the country.

The Turkish military has stepped up operations against the PKK after a fragile ceasefire broke down in the summer of 2015. Since then, there has been a dramatic surge in violence that shows no sign of ending.

Last week’s double bombing in Istanbul, which targeted police after a match of the Besiktas football club, was claimed by the Kurdistan Freedom Falcons (TAK) seen as a radical offshoot of the PKK.

The attack in Istanbul prompted a sharp response from Erdogan, who vowed Ankara would "fight the scourge of terrorism right to the end".

"They should know that they will not get away with it ... They will pay a heavier price."


Sunday, December 11, 2016

Turkey says Kurdish militants may be behind soccer bombing that killed 38

Turkey says Kurdish militants may be behind soccer bombing that killed 38

by Reuters
Turkey said on Sunday that Kurdish militants may be responsible for the two bombs that killed 38 people and wounded 155 in what looked to be a coordinated attack on police outside a soccer stadium in Istanbul after a match between two top teams.

The blasts on Saturday night - a car bomb outside the Vodafone Arena, home to Istanbul's Besiktas soccer team, followed by a suicide bomb attack in an adjacent park less than a minute later - shook a nation still trying to recover from a series of deadly bombings this year in cities including Istanbul and the capital Ankara.

There was no claim of responsibility, but Deputy Prime Minister Numan Kurtulmus said early indications pointed to the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), which has carried out a three-decade insurgency, mainly in Turkey's largely Kurdish southeast. Ten people have been detained so far, he said.

"The arrows point at the PKK," Kurtulmus told CNN Turk in an interview. "There will be an announcement once the investigations are over. We cannot say anything definite for now."

He said Turkey's allies should show solidarity with it in the fight against terrorism, a reference to the long-standing disagreement with fellow NATO member Washington over Syria policy. The United States backs the Syrian Kurdish YPG in the fight against Islamic State. Turkey says the militia is an extension of the PKK and a terrorist group.

Flags were at half mast, and Sunday was declared a day of national mourning, the prime minister's office said in a statement. A march against terrorism had been called for noon local time (0900 GMT) in Istanbul, Kurtulmus said.

President Tayyip Erdogan cancelled a planned trip to Kazakhstan, his office said. Erdogan described the blasts as a terrorist attack on police and civilians. He said the aim of the bombings, two hours after the end of a match attended by thousands of people, had been to cause maximum casualties.

"Nobody should doubt that with God's will, we as a countryand a nation will overcome terror, terrorist organisations ...and the forces behind them," he said in a statement.

In addition to the Kurdish insurgency, Turkey is also battling Islamic State as a member of the U.S.-led coalition against the jihadist group. Less than a week ago, Islamic State urged its supporters to target Turkey's "security, military, economic and media establishment".

'THEY BRING US TOGETHER'
Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu said the first explosion, which came around two hours after the end of the match between Besiktas and Bursaspor, was at an assembly point for riot police. The second came as police surrounded the suicide bomber in the nearby Macka park.

"According to the latest information we have received, 38 of our nation's children have reached martyrdom after last night's cruel attack," Soylu told a news conference.

"These cruel attacks do not discourage us, to the contrary they brings us together as a nation."

He said seven victims were civilians and one remained unidentified. A total of 155 people were being treated in hospital, with 14 of them in intensive care and five in surgery.

"Those attacking our nation's unity and solidarity willnever win," Sports Minister Akif Cagatay Kilic said on Twitter.Transport Minister Ahmet Arslan, also writing on Twitter,described it as a terrorist attack.

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg condemned what he described as "horrific acts of terror", while European leaders also sent messages of solidarity. The United States condemned the attack and said it stood with its NATO ally.

The bombings come five months after Turkey was shaken by a failed military coup, in which more than 240 people were killed, many of them in Istanbul, as rogue soldiers commandeered tanks and fighter jets in a bid to seize power.

Istanbul has seen several other attacks this year, including in June, when around 45 people were killed and hundreds wounded as three suspected Islamic State militants carried out a gun and bomb attack on its main Ataturk airport.


Friday, August 19, 2016

Two Car Bombs Kill At Least 7 And Wound Hundreds In Southeast Turkey

Two Car Bombs Kill At Least 7 And Wound Hundreds In Southeast Turkey

DIYARBAKIR, Turkey, Aug 18 (Reuters) - Two bomb attacks blamed on Kurdish militants killed seven members of the security forces and wounded 224 people in southeast Turkey on Thursday, officials and security sources said, in a renewed escalation of violence across the region.



A car bomb ripped through a police station in the city of Elazig at 9:20 a.m. (0620 GMT) as officers arrived for work. Three police officers were killed and 217 people were wounded, 85 of them police officers, Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said.

Offices in the police station were left in ruins and filled with smoke after the bomb exploded in front of the complex, destroying part of the facade, CNN Turk footage showed.

Less than four hours later, a roadside bomb believed to have been planted by Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) militants tore through a military vehicle in the Hizan district of Bitlis province, security sources said.

They said the blast killed three soldiers and a member of the state-sponsored village guard militia and wounded another seven soldiers.

No one immediately claimed responsibility for the bombings, but Yildirim said there was no doubt they were carried out by the PKK, deemed a terrorist organization by Turkey, the United States and the European Union.



ILYAS AKENGIN VIA GETTY IMAGES


“The (PKK) terror group has lost its chain of command. Its elements inside (Turkey) are carrying out suicide attacks randomly wherever they get the opportunity,” Yildirim told reporters in Elazig.

“We have raised the state of alarm to a higher level,” he said at the scene of the attack, where a crowd chanted “Damn the PKK!”

The PKK has carried out dozens of attacks on police and military posts since 2015 in the largely Kurdish southeast in its fight for greater autonomy for Turkey’s 15 million Kurds.

Elazig, a conservative province that votes in large numbers for the ruling AK Party, had been spared violence until now.

Video footage showed a plume of black smoke rising above the city after the blast, which uprooted trees and gouged a large crater outside the police complex, which is situated on a busy thoroughfare in the city of 420,000 people.

In Van province, further east, two police officers and one civilian were killed and 73 people were wounded late on Wednesday when a car bomb exploded near a police station, the local governor’s office said in a statement.

No one claimed responsibility for the attack in Van, a largely Kurdish province on the Iranian border. The Van governor’s office said the PKK was responsible.

The southeast has been scorched by violence since a 2 1/2-year ceasefire with the PKK collapsed in July last year. Thousands of militants and hundreds of soldiers and police officers have been killed, according to official figures. Rights groups say about 400 civilians have also been killed.

On Thursday, PKK militants also attacked a police checkpoint in the southeastern town of Semdinli, near the Iraqi and Iranian borders, wounding two police officers, Dogan news agency said.

More than 40,000 people have been killed in violence since the PKK first took up arms in 1984.

Thursday, June 30, 2016

Three suicide bomb blasts at Istanbul airport - killed 42, more than 200 injured >>

Three suicide bomb blasts at Istanbul airport - killed 42, more than 200 injured >>

ISTANBUL -- It was an attack that echoed the carnage earlier this year at the Brussels airport, down to the taxi that carried the men to their target: Inciting panic and then taking lethal advantage, three suicide attackers unleashed a deadly tide of bullets and bombs at Istanbul's Ataturk Airport, leaving 42 dead.

Authorities blamed the Islamic State for the blood bath late Tuesday, a co-ordinated assault on one of the world's busiest airports and on a key NATO ally that plays a crucial role in the fight against the extremist group.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility by the militant group.
Although the attack took a heavy toll, the assailants were initially thwarted by the extensive security on the airport's perimeter, Turkish officials said.
"When the terrorists couldn't pass the regular security system, when they couldn't pass the scanners, police and security controls, they returned and took their weapons out of their suitcases and opened fire at random at the security check," Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said.
One attacker detonated his explosives downstairs at the arrivals terminal, one went upstairs and blew himself up in the departure hall, and the third waited outside for the fleeing crowd and caused the final lethal blast, two Turkish officials said, speaking on condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to speak about the investigation publicly. None of the attackers were Turks, a third official said.
As the chaos unfolded, terrified travellers were sent running first from one explosion and then another. Airport surveillance video showed a panicked crowd of people, some rolling suitcases behind them, stampeding down a corridor, looking fearfully over their shoulders.
Other surveillance footage posted on social media showed one explosion, a ball of fire that sent terrified passengers racing for cover. Another showed an attacker, felled by a gunshot from a security officer, blowing himself up seconds later.
Cihan Tunctas had just disembarked from a flight from Azerbaijan when he heard the sound of gunfire.
"Then the bomb exploded. We were at the exit and ... the roof collapsed on our heads," Tunctas said. The group tried to escape, but their path was blocked by the arrival of a second attacker.
"Two of the security guards noticed him. They walked toward him. Just as they were walking toward him, I turned that way. They just caught him and at that moment he detonated the bomb."
Investigators later found a Kalashnikov assault rifle, a handgun and two grenades on the bodies, according to the state-run Anadolu news service. Raids at two addresses also uncovered encrypted organizational documents and computer files, the news agency said.
Although the government quickly blamed the Islamic State, there was no immediate claim of responsibility by the extremist group, which did not mention the bloodshed on its social media sites Wednesday. However, an infographic released to celebrate the second anniversary of its self-proclaimed caliphate claimed to have "covert units" in Turkey and other countries.
Islamic State, however, rarely claims attacks in Turkey. One possible reason is a reluctance to be seen as killing fellow Muslims, said Anthony Skinner, director of the analyst group Verisk Maplecroft. Another is its desire to exploit the violent rift between Turkey and Kurdish rebels, he said.
"It very clearly meets Islamic State's strategic objectives to leave this ambiguity," Skinner said.
Yildirim, the Turkish prime minister, also suggested the attack could be linked to steps Ankara took Monday toward mending strained ties with Israel and Russia. Late Wednesday, he told the Turkish public the authorities were increasingly convinced that the Islamic State group, also known as Daesh, was responsible for the ghastly attack.
"Our thought that it is Daesh, continues to gain weight," Yildirim said.
A key partner in the U.S.-led coalition against the Islamic State group, Turkey faces an array of security threats from other groups as well, including ultra-left radicals and Kurdish rebels demanding greater autonomy in the restive southeast.
The country shares long, porous borders with both Syria and Iraq, where IS controls large pockets of territory, and the government has blamed IS for several major bombings over the past year, including in the capital Ankara, and on tourists in Istanbul.
"The reality is that Turkey is situated in a very vulnerable situation, geographically speaking," Skinner said.
Victims in Tuesday's attack included at least 13 foreigners and several people remained unidentified Wednesday. The Istanbul governor's office said more than 230 people were wounded and dozens remained in critical condition.
Among the dead was Muhammed Eymen Demirci, who had just landed a job on the airport's ground services crew after more than a year of unemployment: "I got the job bro!" the 25-year-old texted a friend in May.
He died while waiting for a bus after his shift. A childhood friend who had helped Demirci get the job was devastated. "He was such a friendly person, a man who fought for his ideals," Deniz Dogan told The Associated Press. "Now I wish he hadn't gotten the job."
"So, what can we think? We cannot think anything," said Ali Batur, whose brother also died. "A terror attack might happen everywhere, it does happen everywhere."
Dozens of anxious friends and relatives waited Wednesday outside Istanbul's Bakirkoy Hospital.
"You can hear that people are wailing here," said Serdar Tatlisu, a relative of a victim. "We cannot cope anymore, we can't just stay still. We need some kind of solution for whatever problem there is."
Funerals for some of the victims began Wednesday as Turkish authorities sought to put together an attack timeline, going through surveillance footage and interviewing witnesses. A Turkish court imposed a media ban on any information not officially released by the government.
The devastation at Istanbul's airport was a reminder of the March 22 attack on the Brussels airport, where two suicide bombings ripped through check-in counters, killing 16 people. The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for that attack, as well as an explosion the same day at a Brussels subway station that killed 16 more people.
As dawn broke Wednesday, workers were removing debris from the Istanbul airport and mere hours after the terminal erupted into chaos, it reopened to flights. It took 12 days for flights to resume in Brussels, and more than two months for the terminal building to fully reopen.
Turkey has suffered a series of attacks that have frightened away visitors and devastated its economy, which relies heavily on tourism.
The government has stepped up controls at airports and land borders and deported thousands of foreign fighters, but has struggled to tackle the extremist threat while also conducting security operations against Kurdish rebels. Turkish airports have security checks at both the entrances to terminal buildings and before the entrances to departure gates.
This year alone, a Jan. 12 attack that Turkish authorities blamed on IS claimed the lives of a dozen German tourists visiting Istanbul's historic sites. On March 19, a suicide bombing rocked Istanbul's main pedestrian street, killing five people, including the bomber, whom the authorities identified as a Turkish national linked to IS.
Last October, twin suicide bombings hit a peace rally outside Ankara's train station, killing 103 people. There was no claim of responsibility but Turkish authorities blamed it on an Islamic State cell.
------
Fraser reported from Ankara. Zeynep Bilginsoy in Istanbul; Lori Hinnant in Paris; Bram Janssen in Istanbul, Desmond Butler in Washington, D.C. and Scott Mayerowitz in New York contributed.

Source



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